COVID-19 – A sign of imminent doom or a Wake up Call?

While the entire world is gearing for a lockdown, with no signs of respite, 2020 has begun with a grim look in the first quarter. Apparently, the previous year had some genuine parting gift for this year in the form of novel Coronavirus or COVID-19. The virus has caused a pandemic across the globe, spreading in an accelerated pace leaving countries like China, Italy, Spain,…

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The Five Covid-19 Policy Priorities Congress Should Adopt

A daily update from Andy Slavitt, former head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Today I’ll share more about the crises of today (masks & beds), the crises of tomorrow (ventilators), clinical protocols, what Congress needs to do, and what others are doing to help us sustain #StayHome. Hospital masks: As I said last week doctors and nurses on the frontlines are the…

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Fat to Fit? “The 4 hour body” is the best fitness book | Summary

Why “The 4 hour body” by Timothy Ferriss is the best fitness book The 4 hour body book-There is a wealth of information in this book, and it will definitely help you lose weight, gain strength and run faster in few months. Like most of Ferriss’ work, this book could easily be misunderstood. Be clear that it isn’t about shortcuts or ‘hacks’, it’s about efficiently…

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The Quarantine Diaries

Global dispatches from people sheltering in place People everywhere are sharing their quarantine, shelter-in-place, and social distancing stories on Medium. (You can share your own story on Medium, too.) I Am Quarantined in Northern Italy. Here’s What It’s Like. What It’s Like to Live in China During the Coronavirus Outbreak What It’s Like to Be In Prison During the Covid-19 Epidemic The Coronavirus Plague Seen…

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Food Waste and Composting

Food Waste and Composting- We live in a world with a one-way system. We take resources, use them and bin them. The most waste ends up in landfill sites. The problems with landfill are many. Materials like plastics and metals take many hundreds of years to break down if they do at all. This means that we accumulate rubbish at an exponential rate, especially since…

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9 Spring-Time Walking Goals to Stay Motivated All Year

Walking outdoors is one of the easiest and best things you can do to improve mental and physical health. Especially as the weather warms, it can be a nice change of pace to swap the treadmill for a new hike or path. To get the most out of your walk, it’s important to set smart goals. Whatever your fitness level, these nine goals will motivate you to raise the bar and get…

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Frightening Lessons from the 1918 Pandemic and Why History May Repeat

COVID-19 has the advantages of simple math, human overconfidence and Mother Nature’s lack of empathy Aug. 27, 1918, two sailors at a pier in Boston came down with Spanish Flu. They were the first people in the United States to be stricken by the virus. Within a week, 100 sailors at the pier were falling victim each day. By September, one person was dying every…

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What COVID-19 and Climate Change Have in Common

On this week’s episode of Political Climate, we discuss the behavioral science behind our response to these global threats. With cases recorded in more than 140 countries, the novel coronavirus has become a global health crisis. In the U.S., bars and offices have been closed, conferences canceled and kids kept home from school in an attempt to slow the spread. President Trump has declared a national…

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How to not practice emotional distancing during social distancing

We’re living in strange times. As we grapple with new and dismaying terms — flattening the curve, social distancing — let me ask a rhetorical question. When you’re “with yourself” do you feel alone? I do sometimes. And then I try to remember three things: the differences between being alone and being lonely, the deep ties that bind us, and the connection I feel when practicing kindness…

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The 3 best takeaways from the book “How Not to Die”

“How Not to Die” by Michael Greger How Not to Die contains treasures for members of any dietary persuasion. Its references are sprawling, its scope is vast, and its puns aren’t always bad. The book makes an exhaustive case for food as medicine and reassures readers that — far from tinfoil hat territory — being wary of the profit-driven “medical-industrial complex” is justified. Click here to…

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